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Service Delivery Projects  E-mail

The following table contains a list of some of the service delivery research projects on which TVCC staff members were named investigators. Abstracts of the projects, their publications, and presentations appear below the table. 

The projects are subdivided below into the following categories:

  • Delivery of Services
  • Family-Centred Services
  • Program Evaluation

Names of present TVCC staff members are bolded and italicized.
Names of past TVCC staff members are italicized only.

Publications that have resulted from these selected projects are also listed. For more information on how to obtain a copy of an article, please see Accessing Journal Articles.

 


 LIST OF SERVICE DELIVERY PROJECTS

DELIVERY OF SERVICES

A province-wide survey about services for children with disabilities and their families

Clinical decision making in pediatric rehabilitation

Community-university research alliance: Enhancing the life experiences of school-aged children with special needs

Community-university research alliance: Enhancing the participation of children with special needs

Development of a Canadian Childhood Disability Research Consortium

Electronic mail as a service delivery option for individuals with physical disabilities

Evaluating the school health support services consultation model of occupational therapy services

Managing complex concussions in children and youth: A multidisciplinary approach to a multifaceted problem

Measuring the external impact of university-community research alliances

The influence of TVCC's services on young adult graduates: A test of TVCC's vision

The validity of alternative response formats for the Test fo Aided-Communication Symbol Performance (TASP)

FAMILY-CENTRED SERVICE

Children with disabilities in Ontario: A profile of children's services (FCS-II)

Family-centred service in Ontario's children's rehabilitation centres (FCS-I)

Implementing family-centred service in Ontario children's rehabilitation services

Moving ideas into practice

PROGRAM EVALUATIONS

An evaluation of the Pediatric Acquired Brain Injury Community Outreach Program (PABICOP)

An evaluation of the Youth En Route Program (YER) 

Development Resources for Infants (DRI): An evaluation

Evaluation of the Kids On-Track Program (KOT)

Evaluation of the School-Support Program - Autism Spectrum Disorder (SSP-ASD)

Peer-mediated social skills for students with autism spectrum disorder: Promoting generalization through a school-wide approach (A program evaluation of the peers establishing effective relationships program [P.E.E.R. Pals Program])


DELIVERY OF SERVICES

A province-wide survey about services for children with disabilities and their families
Investigators: M. Law, P. Rosenbaum, G. King, S. King, & M. Kertoy
Affiliation of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Research
Funding: Ontario Ministry of Health funding for CanChild, 1999-2001
Status: Completed
     This cross-sectional survey involved participants at 16 sites from both the Ontario Association of Children’s Rehabilitation Services and Community Care Access Centres. Data were collected from 494 parents of children with disabilities, 324 service providers, and 15 CEOs/managers. The data showed that a family-centred approach is endorsed and supported and, in general, is being provided well. The findings are summarized in three reports that outline how the findings will be useful for parents, service providers, administrative decision makers, and legislative policy makers. All reports are available through the website
http://www.canchild.ca/.
Reports:
   King, S., Law, M., King, G., Kertoy, M., Hurley, P., & Rosenbaum, P. (2000). Children with disabilities in Ontario: A profile of children’s services. Part 1: Children, families and services. Published and distributed by CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Researchhttp://www.canchild.ca/.
   King, S., Law, M., King, G., Kertoy, M., Hurley, P., & Rosenbaum, P. (2000). Children with disabilities in Ontario: A profile of children’s services. Part 1: Children, families and services. Published and distributed by CanChildCentre for Childhood Disability Researchhttp://www.canchild.ca/.
     King, S., Law, M., King, G., Kertoy, M., Hurley, P., & Rosenbaum, P. (2000). Children with disabilities in Ontario: A profile of children’s services. Part 2: Perceptions about family-centred service delivery for children with disabilities. Published and distributed by
CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Researchhttp://www.canchild.ca/.
     King, S., Law, M., King, G., Kertoy, M., Hurley, P., & Rosenbaum, P. (2000). Children with disabilities in Ontario: A profile of children’s services. Part 3: Factors affecting family-centred service delivery for children with disabilities. Published and distributed by
CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research. http://www.canchild.ca.
Publications:
     King, G., Kertoy, M., King, S., Law, M., Rosenbaum, P., & Hurley, P. (2003). A measure of parents’ and service providers’ beliefs about participation in family-centered services. Children’s Health Care, 32(3), 191-124.
     Law, M., Hanna, S., King, G., Hurley, P., King, S., Kertoy, M., & Rosenbaum, P. (2003). Factors affecting family-centred service delivery for children with disabilities. Child: Care, Health and Development, 29(5), 357-366.
     King, G., King, S., Law, M., Kertoy, M., Rosenbaum, P., & Hurley, P. (2002). Family-centred service in Ontario: A “Best Practice” approach for children with disabilities and their families. Published and distributed by
CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Researchhttp://www.canchild.ca/
   King, S., Law, M., King, G., Kertoy, M., Hurley, P., & Rosenbaum, P. (2000). Children with disabilities in Ontario: A profile of children’s services. Part 1: Children, families and services. Published and distributed by CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Researchhttp://www.canchild.ca/.
     King, S., Law, M., King, G., Kertoy, M., Hurley, P., & Rosenbaum, P. (2000). Children with disabilities in Ontario: A profile of children’s services. Part 2: Perceptions about family-centred service delivery for children with disabilities. Published and distributed by
CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Researchhttp://www.canchild.ca/.
     King, S., Law, M., King, G., Kertoy, M., Hurley, P., & Rosenbaum, P. (2000). Children with disabilities in Ontario: A profile of children’s services. Part 3: Factors affecting family-centred service delivery for children with disabilities. Published and distributed by
CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research. http://www.canchild.ca
.


Clinical decision making in pediatric rehabilitation
Investigators: G. King, D. Bartlett, C. Willoughby, M. Gilpin, M. A. Tucker, M. Currie, & D. Strachan
Affiliations of Collaborators: The University of Western Ontario, Child and Parent Resource Institute (CPRI)
Funding: The Hospital for Sick Children Foundation, 2002-2003, $112,671
Status: Completed
     Therapists who provide clinical services to children with disabilities need to make appropriate decisions about goals and intervention strategies that are based on theory, evidence, and reflect the needs and priorities of the children and their families. Two qualitative studies (involving a total of 30 occupational, physical, speech-language, and behaviour therapists) were conducted to determine the most commonly used clinical practice schemas of expert, intermediate level, and novice therapists who deliver services to school-aged children. Clinical practice schemas are the knowledge structures that therapists use to guide their formulation of a clinical problem, their search for relevant information, and their selection of intervention strategies to propose to families. Study 1 was an interview study in which therapists were asked to reflect on critical incidents in their past practice that made them aware of their decision-making process. Study 2 involved interviews with therapists while they watched videotapes of themselves interacting with clients. Findings will assist therapists and managers in providing informed, effective, and efficient rehabilitation services for children.
Publications:
     King, G., Bartlett, D., Willoughby, C., & Currie, M. (2002). Expertise in services for children with special needs (Focus On, Volume 2 Issue 1). London, ON: Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs.
     King, G., Currie, M., Bartlett, D., Gilpin, M., Willoughby, C., Strachan, D., Tucker, M. A., & Baxter, D. (2005). Clinical decision making expertise in pediatric rehabilitation therapists (Focus On, Volume 5 Issue 1). London, ON: Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs.
     Gilpin, M., King, G., Currie, M., Bartlett, D., Willoughby, C., Strachan, D., Tucker, M. A., & Baxter, D. (2005). The Multidimensional Peer Rating of the Clinical Behaviours of Pediatric Therapists (MPR) (Focus On, Volume 5 Issue 4). London, ON: Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs.
     King, G., Currie, M., Bartlett, D. J., Gilpin, M., Willoughby, C., Tucker, M. A., Strachan, D., & Baxter, D. (2007). The development of expertise in pediatric rehabilitation therapists: Changes in approach, self-knowledge, and use of enabling and customizing strategies. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 10(3), 223–240.
     King, G., Bartlett, D., Currie, M., Gilpin, M., Baxter, D., Willoughby, C., Tucker, M. A., & Strachan, D. (2007). Measuring the expertise of pediatric rehabilitation therapists. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 54(4), 381-406.
     King, G. (2007). Expertise in evidence-based clinical decision making: Working effectively with families. Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 16(3), 2-7.
     King, G., Currie, M., Bartlett, D. J., Strachan, D., Tucker, M. A., & Willoughby, C. (in press). The development of expertise in paediatric rehabilitation therapists: The roles of motivation, openness to experience, and types of caseload experience. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal.
     King, G., Bartlett, D., Currie, M., Gilpin, M., Baxter, D., Willoughby, C., Tucker, M. A., & Strachan, D. (2008) Measuring the expertise of paediatric rehabilitation therapists. International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, 55(1), 5-26.   
Presentations:
     Bartlett, D., Willoughby, C., King, G., Tucker, M. A., Currie, M., Gilpin, M., Strachan, D., & Baxter, D. (2004, June). Fostering the development of clinical expertise among pediatric therapists. Presented at Children's Developmental Rehabilitation Centre (CDRP), Chedoke Child and Family Centre, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, ON.
     King, G., Baxter, D., Currie, M., Willoughby, C., Bartlett, D., Strachan, D., Gilpin, M, & Tucker, M. A. (2004, October). Clinical decision making in pediatric rehabilitation. Presented at the annual meeting of the Ontario Association of Children's Rehabilitation Services, Richmond Hill, ON.

 Development Resources for Infants: An evaluation
Investigators: J. Kneale Fanning, M. A. Tucker, J. Legros-Kelly, A. McVittie, J. Pigache, & A. Conti-Becker
Affiliations of Collaborators: St. Joseph Health Centre, Child and Parent Resource Institute
Funding: Thames Valley Children's Centre Program Evaluation Support Fund, 2003-2004, $10,000, and 2005-2006, $6,060
Status:Completed 
     The provision of a coordinated system of services that emphasizes partnership among families, professionals, and agencies is critical in developing children and enhancing families' quality of life. In 1999, the Developmental Resources for Infants (DRI) program was initiated by 2 community agencies and 2 hospitals to provide a collaborative approach to healthcare services for children from birth to two years of age. Prior to the implementation of DRI, families of children at risk for developmental delays or with established physical, cognitive, and/or multiple disabilities were often referred to or received services from one or more of these agencies. This meant that services such as intake, assessment, and intervention were duplicated, resulting in system inefficiencies.
     DRI was implemented with a common referral form, a central phone line, a coordinated intake, and a shared database. Through this collaboration, families with young, at-risk children could access the most appropriate and timely services to meet their needs through one point access. The collaboration provided an opportunity to increase communication among agencies and ensure services were not duplicated. In 2002, a research task force was formed to evaluate the DRI program. The study evaluated the DRI tools and processes, the staff and leaderships' perception of system collaboration, and the families' and community members' satisfaction with DRI services.
     The study found that DRI had achieved an identity and operating procedure that were unique and separate from any of the four partner agencies.
Publication:
     Kneale Fanning, J., Legros-Kelly, J., McVittie, A., Pigache, J., Tucker, M. A., & Servais, M. (2005). An evaluation of Developmental Resources for Infants: Collaborative health care services for infants and their families (Facts To Go, Volume 1 Issue 4, December 2005). London, ON: Thames Valley Children's Centre.
Presentations:
     King, G., Tucker, M. A., Currie, M., Gilpin, M., & Strachan, D. (2005, October). Fostering the development of expertise among pediatric therapists. Presented at the annual meeting of the Ontario Association of Children's Rehabilitation Centres, Niagara Falls, ON.
     King, G., Baxter, D., Currie, M., Willoughby, C., Bartlett, D., Strachan, D., Gilpin, M., & Tucker, M. A. (2006, March). Expertise and clinical decision making in pediatric rehabilitation. Presented at Novita Children's Services, Adelaide, Australia.
     King, G., Baxter, D., Currie, M., Willoughby, C., Bartlett, D., Strachan, D., Gilpin, M., & Tucker, M. A. (2006, March). Expertise and clinical decision making in pediatric rehabilitation. Presented at Scope, Melbourne, Australia.


Community-university research alliance: Enhancing the life experiences of school-aged children with special needs who receive therapy services RACSN final report
Investigators: G. King, D. Bartlett, M. Kertoy, S. Killip, L. Miller, J. Specht, & C. Willoughby
Affiliations of Collaborators: The University of Western Ontario, Thames Valley District School Board, Huron University College, Child and Parent Resource Institute
Funding: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, 2000-2003, $570,000
Status: Completed
     This community-university research alliance, titled “Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs” (RACSN), was a three-year program of research that looked for practical ways to enhance the quality of life of school-aged children with special needs. The Alliance provided the necessary structure and organizational support to allow the partner groups to pool their energies, skills, knowledge, and strengths. RACSN worked towards it mandate through knowledge generation (50 research projects conducted), research education and training (62 university students and 30 service providers and teachers and school board staff participated in funded and unfunded research training opportunities), and knowledge sharing (through 11 easy-to-read summaries, 4 newsletters, 1 report, 28 presentations, and 20 external publications). For more information, visit RACSN’s website at http://www.racsn.ca/.

Community-university research alliance: Enhancing the participation of children with special needs
Investigators: G. King, D. Bartlett, D. DeWit, M. Kertoy, S. Killip, L. Miller, J. Specht, T. Spencer, & S. Stewart
Affiliations of Collaborators: Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Child and Parent Resource Institute, London District Catholic School Board, Thames Valley District School Board, The University of Western Ontario
Funding: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, 2003-2005, $397,800
Status: Completed
     The Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs (RACSN) was awarded a further two years of funding to continue to work towards its mandate of “Enhancing the community participation of children with special needs.” For more information and to download a copy of the RACSN Final Report, visit RACSN’s website at http://www.racsn.ca/.

 


Development of a Canadian Childhood Disability Research Consortium
Investigators: P. Rosenbaum, M. Law, J. Darrah, C. Gibson, G. King, A. Majnemer, M. Milner, M. O’Donnell, C. Richards, & E. Wood
Affiliations of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, The University of Western Ontario, Easter Seal Society, McGill University, Bloorview MacMillan Centre, University of British Columbia, Laval University, Dalhousie University
Funding: Canadian Institutes of Health Research, 1999-2000, $43,810
Status: Completed
     CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research coordinated a priority-setting project with a group of researchers from across Canada. This project created a web-based, interaction communication site for identification of participants and research issues, and discussions of strategies to further develop childhood disability research, a video-based case study, and hosted a workshop. The Consortium developed an outline of directions for disability research that will be helpful to academic colleagues and others in this country. This Research Consortium will collaborate to conduct research, build knowledge, and disseminate findings in order to improve the quality of children and youth with disabilities and their families, and influence service delivery and policy. A full report is available on the web at http://www.canchild.ca .
Publications:
     Rosenbaum, P., Law, M., Darrah, J., Gibson, C., King, G., Majnemer, A., Milner, M., O’Donnell, M., Richards, C. L., & Wood, E. (2000). Setting research priorities for childhood disability: Report from CIHR Opportunities Project. Published and distributed by CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research. http://www.canchild.ca .

 


Electronic mail as a service delivery option for individuals with physical disabilities 
Investigators: E. MacKinnon, J. Scott, & G. King
Funding: Easter Seal Research Institute, 1990-1991, $11,737
Status: Completed
     This pilot study evaluated the use of e-mail in providing clinical and technical assistance to individuals with physical disabilities from an augmentative communication service. Sixteen individuals with physical disabilities, ranging in age from 7 to 25 years and meeting specific study inclusion criteria, were randomly assigned to receive either the electronic mail service for a period of approximately six months (n=7) or to a control group (n=9). Both groups completed satisfaction questionnaires at predetermined time intervals and both the number of independent contacts by subjects and number of contacts by caregivers were recorded.
     As expected, subjects in the e-mail condition made an appreciably greater number of independent contacts than did their control group counterparts. Satisfaction with the e-mail service decreased over time as technical problems were encountered with the particular telecommunication system that was employed. It was concluded that an e-mail service is useful only for programs able to provide extensive, ongoing support to users. A reliable, user-friendly telecommunication system is essential. Such a service can have appreciable benefit in terms of enabling non-speaking individuals to have an independent means of communication with service providers. Electronic mail increased the number of independent contacts made by non-speaking children to service providers, in comparison to a group of children not using it. A reliable, user-friendly telecommunication system can have appreciable benefit by enabling non-speaking individuals to have an independent means of communication with service providers.
Publication:
     MacKinnon, E., King, G., Cathers, T., & Scott, J. (1995). Electronic mail: Service from afar for individuals with physical disabilities. Journal of Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 11, 236-243.

Evaluation of the school health support services consultation model of occupational therapy services for children with fine motor difficulties
Investigators: M. A. Tucker, B. Sillett, C. Bayona, B. Bocking, M. Scheid, & M. Fielding
Affiliations of Collaborators: Community Care Access Centre of London and Middlesex, ParaMed Home Health Care Services
Funding: Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs Service Provider Award, 2002-2003, $10,000
Status: Completed
     Consultative occupational therapy services are becoming widely used in the school environment. However, few studies have evaluated the utility of and process by which these services are delivered. This study examined whether the written communication and fine motor skills of 23 children with fine motor difficulties improved after receiving school-based occupational therapy delivered according to a consultation model of service delivery. In addition, the study assessed the process of service delivery, including treatment fidelity, or the extent to which consultation services were implemented as intended. Statistically significant and practically meaningful improvement was found in written communication on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-Classroom Edition (VABS-C) and School Functional Assessment-Version 3.0 (SFA), and in fine motor skills on the SFA, but not on the VABS-C. An examination of the service delivery process revealed that therapists deviated from a purely consultative model, with 86% providing some direct therapy to children. Parents were mostly satisfied with services received whereas teachers were indifferent or somewhat dissatisfied. Treatment fidelity is taken into consideration when discussing study findings. Recommendations to enhance school-based occupational therapy services delivered within a primarily consultative model are given and suggestions for future research are provided.
Publications:
     McDougall, J., Bayona, C. L., Tucker, M. A., Nichols, M., & King, G. (2005). School-based occupational therapy: Evaluation service delivery models (Focus On, Volume 5 Issue 2). London, ON: Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs. (http://www.racsn.ca
Presentation:
     McDougall, J., Tucker, M. A., Bocking, B., & Nichols, M. (2005, October). A study to evaluate a school-based consultation model of occupational therapy services for children with fine motor difficulties. Presented at the annual meeting of the Ontario Association of Children’s Rehabilitation Services 2005, Niagara Falls, ON.

Managing complex concussions in children and youth: A multidisciplinary approach to a multifaceted problem
Investigators: Sara Somers & Janice Gray
Status:
Underway, 2010-2014
     Recent research has highlighted the impact of concussion in high school aged athletes. In addition, research has also shown concussion rates for female athletes to be higher than male athletes and for their symptoms to take longer to resolve. The present study will investigate the incidence of concussion and duration of symptoms for referrals to the Paediatric Brain Injury Community Outreach Program (PABICOP) over time. This population is not restricted to high school aged athletes. By identifying possible trends in referrals, the hope is to be able to provide a more proactive targeted approach to supporting children and youth in their recovery from concussion.
Publication:
Somers, S., Gray, J., & McDougall, J.
(2010). Managing complex concussions in children and youth: A multidisciplinary approach to a multifaceted problem. [Abstract] Brain Injury 24(3), 51-52.
Presentation:
Somers, S., Gray, J., & McDougall, J.
(2010, March). Managing complex concussions in children and youth: A multidisciplinary approach to a multifaceted problem. Presented at the 8th World Congress on Brain Injury, Washington, DC.
Gray, J., Somers, S., Van de Vooren, R., & Frid, P. (2012, June). Concussion in children and youth: Tracking the trends in a pediatric brain injury program. Poster presented at the 89th annual Canadian Paediatric Society Conference, London, ON.

 


Measuring the external impact of university-community research alliances and partnerships addressing social/health services issues
Investigators: G. King, M. Law, C. Forchuk, T. Willoughby, P. Rosenbaum, M. Kertoy, H. Chalmers, J. Specht, & M. Currie
Affiliations of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, The University of Western Ontario, Brock University, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Funding: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, 2002-2005, $150,000
Status: Completed
     Research partnerships between universities and community organizations are proliferating in Canada. These community-university research partnerships provide an infrastructure from which research projects develop and findings are shared. They are assumed to produce knowledge that informs community members and leads to more efficient service delivery, more effective clinical programs, and enhanced community development. There is, however, little concrete evidence of these benefits, in part due to the lack of a reliable and valid tool to measure various types of community impacts on a generic level.
     Five research partnerships joined together to develop a reliable and valid survey measure of the community impacts of research partnerships between universities and community agencies that address social or health services issues.
     The five community-university research partnerships who joined together to develop the CIROP measure are: (1) The Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs (RACSN) based in London, Ontario; (2) The Community-University Research Alliance (CURA) titled "Enhancement of Youth Resiliency and Reduction of Harmful Behaviours Leading to Healthy Lifestyle Choices (YLC-CURA)" based in St. Catharines, Ontario; (3) The CURA titled "Partnerships in Capacity Building, Housing, Community Economic Development and Psychiatric Survivors" based in London, Ontario; (4) CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Researchbased in Hamilton, Ontario; (5) A partnership project titled "Therapeutic Relationships from Hospital to Community - Implementation of Evidence Based Practice" based in London, St. Thomas, Hamilton, Penetanguishene, Whitby, and Toronto, Ontario.
Development of a Model of Impact:
     Alliances have long been an important strategy for health promotion and community development. They are now becoming an Impact Modelimportant approach to generating research that is thought to have real-world relevance and easy applicability because of the involvement of community members. 
     A comprehensive, dynamic model of community impacts of research partnerships in social or health services was developed. This process-oriented, systems model outlines three major domains of mid-term impact (Enhanced Knowledge, Enhanced Research Skills, and Use of Information) that correspond to the core functions of collaborative research partnerships discussed in the literature (i.e., knowledge generation, research education and training, and knowledge sharing). The model will assist research partners, intended recipients, and funders to understand and evaluate the real-world impacts of community-university research partnerships. The model provides research partnerships with a tool to demonstrate their accountability and to improve their operations and impacts, and evaluators with a tool to guide planning and evaluation efforts. To access the interactive, animated model, visit www.impactmeasure.org/model.htm.
Development of a Measure of Impact:
     The CommCIROP Measureunity Impacts of Research-Oriented Partnerships (CIROP) is a 33-item, generic measure of community members' perceptions of the impact of research partnerships addressing social and health issues. The CIROP was developed using information from the literatures on health promotion, community development, and research utilization, and from focus groups involving 29 key informants. Data from 174 community members were used to determine the factor structure, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability of the four CIROP scales, and to provide evidence of construct validity. The CIROP informs research partnerships about the extent of their impact in the areas of Personal Knowledge Development, Personal Research Skill Development, Organizational/Group Access To and Use of Information, and Community and Organizational Development.
     The CIROP can be used to:
(a) assess the effectiveness of knowledge sharing approaches, (b) determine the most influential activities of partnerships,
(c) determine structural characteristics of partnerships associated with various types of impact, and
(d) demonstrate accountability to funding bodies.
     The CIROP provides a better understanding of community members' perspectives and expectations of research partnerships, which has important implications for knowledge transfer and uptake. The CIROP is available to download for free at http://www.impactmeasure.org/ 
Publication:
    Currie, M., King, G., Rosenbaum, P., Law, M., Kertoy, M., & Specht, J. (2005). A model of impacts of research partnerships in health and social services. Evaluation and Program Planning, 28, 400-412.

 


The influence of Thames Valley Children's Centre’s services on young adult graduates: A test of TVCC’s vision
Investigators: J. LaPorta, G. King, T. Cathers, L. Havens, & C. Young
Funding: Thames Valley Children's Centre, 1997-1998, $4,500
Status: Completed
     This evaluation examined whether the Vision of Thames Valley Children’s Centre, “Our Clients At Their Best,” is being achieved. Fifty past graduates of the Centre were asked about their life experiences and their life satisfaction. They were satisfied with their lives and indicated that the Centre provided useful assistance in enabling them to be their best. It was concluded that services need to target both life-long goals (related to productivity, self-determination, and life satisfaction) and short-term goals related to functional competence (e.g., mobility).
Publication:
     LaPorta, J., King, G., Cathers, T., Havens, L., Young, C., & Aylward, S. (2003). A test of a centre’s vision. Healthcare Management Forum, 16(1), 34-36. 


The validity of alternative response formats for the Test of Aided-Communication Symbol Performance (TASP)
Investigators:
Stacy McDougall, Brent Duncan, & Kelli Vessoyan
Status:
Completed, 2009-2010
     Individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) often have physical difficulties accessing standardized assessment materials. The Test of Aided-Communication symbol Performance (TASP) assesses use of Picture Communication Symbols  by individuals who directly access their AAC systems. Using computerized presentation, equivalency between adapted access response methods for the TASP Symbol Size and Number Subtest and a traditional response method was examined, using a Repeated Measures Experimental Design. Participants included children who use AAC and have direct access.
Presentation:
     McDougall, S., Duncan, B., & Vessoyan, K. (2010). Alternative presentation and response formats for the Test of Aided-Communication Symbol Performance (TASP). Presented at the 14th biennial conference of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Barcelona, Spain.
Publication:
     McDougall, S., Vessoyan, K., & Duncan, B. (2012). Traditional versus computerized presentation and response methods on a structured AAC assessment tool. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 28(2), 127-135.

 


FAMILY-CENTRED SERVICE 

Family-centred service: Family-centred service in Ontario's children's rehabilitation centres (FCS-I)
Investigators: M. Law, P. Rosenbaum, G. King, & S. King
Affiliation of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research
Funding: Ontario Ministry of Health funding for CanChild, 1994-1995
Status: Completed
     This study was designed to determine whether children’s rehabilitation centres in Ontario are highly responsive to the needs of children with disabilities and their families. The findings indicated that they are, and that there is substantial consistency across the centres in the way that service providers communicate with families, respect families’ expertise and strengths, and build positive expectations for children with disabilities.

Family-centred service: Implementing family-centred service in Ontario children's rehabilitation services
Investigators: M. Law, S. Brown, S. Barnes, G. King, P. Rosenbaum, & S. King
Affiliation of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research
Funding: Ontario Ministry of Health funding for CanChild, 1996
Status: Completed
     This qualitative study was designed to explore the effects of implementing family-centred service (FCS). The findings indicate that the implementation of FCS leads to an increased partnership and sharing of power between families and service providers. One of the greatest challenges is how to implement family-centred services on a day-to-day basis within the constraints of limited time and resources. A sustained and participatory leadership appears to facilitate a satisfactory experience of change toward family-centred service.

Family-centred service: Children with disabilities in Ontario: A profile of children's services (FCS-II)
Investigators: P. Rosenbaum, M. Law, G. King, S. King, M. Kertoy, P. Hurley, S. Hanna, & J. Woodside
Affiliation of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research
Funding: Ontario Ministry of Health funding for CanChild, 1998-2000
Status: Completed
     This cross-sectional survey was conducted as a follow-up to a study of family-centred service implementation in Ontario during the early 1990’s. Its purpose was to gain knowledge about the services provided to children with disabilities and their families between 1998-2000, and also to examine perceptions of these services. Data were collected concurrently from parents, service providers, and executive directors/managers of organizations that provide rehabilitation services. The findings are summarized in three reports that provide a profile of children's services in Ontario from 1998-2000, which can be found at http://www.canchild.ca/.

Family-centred service: Moving ideas into practice
Investigators: M. Law, P. Rosenbaum, G. King, S. King, J. Burke-Gaffney, T. Szkut, S. Walter, N. Pollock, & L. Viscardis
Affiliations of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, Hamilton Family Network, The University of Western Ontario, PROSPECTS Parent Network
Funding: Bloorview Children’s Hospital Foundation, 2000-2002, $77,122
Status: Completed
     Family-centred service is a method and philosophy of service delivery for children and parents that emphasizes a partnership between parents and service providers. There is evidence to indicate that family-centred service leads to improved outcomes for children and families. There are, however, few materials that have been shown to help service providers and families implementing family-centred service. The purpose of this research is to develop and evaluate educational materials about family-centred service that can be used by parents and service providers to facilitate the implementation of family-centred services for children with disabilities.
Publications:
     CanChild has published an 18-part series of handouts on family-centred service, available at http://www.canchild.ca/. (1) What is family-centred service? (2) Myths about family-centred service (3) How does family-centred service make a difference? (4) Becoming more family-centred (5) 10 things you can do to be family-centred (6) Identifying and building on parent and family strengths and resources (7) Parent-to-parent support (8) Effective communication in family-centred service (9) Using respectful behviours and language (10) Working together: From providing information to working in partnership (11) Negotiating: Dealing effectively with differences (12) Making decisions together: How to decide what is best (13) Setting goals together (14) Advocacy: How to get the best for your child (15) Getting the most from appointments and meetings (16) Fostering family-centred service in the school (17) Family-centred strategies for wait lists (18) Are we really family-centred? Checklists for families, service providers, and organizations. 

 


PROGRAM EVALUATIONS 

An evaluation of the Pediatric Acquired Brain Injury Community Outreach Program (PABICOP)
Investigators: J. Sommerfreund, E. Rosen, J. Gillett, S. Somers, J. Gray, & J. McDougall
Affiliation of Collaborators: Children’s Hospital of Western Ontario
Funding: Ontario Ministry of Health, 2000-2003, $55,000
Status: Completed
      Acquired brain injury (ABI) is a leading cause of death and disability among children and adolescents in Canada. Children and youth often have medical, physical, cognitive, behavioural, and social problems that arise from their injuries. Families also experience difficulties related to their children's injuries.
     The Pediatric Acquired Brain Injury Community Outreach Program (PABICOP) provides a coordinated, family/community-focused continuum of care to children and youth with acquired brain injuries (ABI) and their families. PABICOP offers, among other services, help with transition from hospital to home, psychosocial support, information and education, school re-entry support, community-based clinics, and crisis intervention.
     The results of a five-year quasi-experimental study to evaluate the program indicated that children and youth with ABI and their families receiving PABICOP services fared significantly better than a comparison group receiving standard clinic-based care on two of PABICOP's program objectives: (1) to enhance caregivers' knowledge about the characteristics of ABI and about effective strategies to deal with associated problems, and (2) to increase child and youth community reintegration/ participation. Moreover, these group differences were maintained one year following initial involvement with PABICOP.
     On average, caregivers perceived PABICOP services to be family-centred. That is, services were viewed as focusing on the family as a whole (rather than the child in isolation) and as seeing families as the experts on their children's abilities and needs. Moreover, on average, caregivers reported high overall satisfaction with the program. 
     Information from this study will be useful in helping to ensure PABICOP continues to meet the needs of children and youth with ABI and their families.
Publications:
     McDougall, J., Servais, M., Sommerfreund, J., Rosen, E., Gillett, J., Gray, J., Somers, S., Frid, P., DeWit, D., Pearlman, L., & Hicock, F.  (2006). An evaluation of the Paediatric Acquired Brain Injury Community Outreach Programme (PABICOP). Brain Injury, 20(11), 1189-1205.
     McDougall, J., Servais, M., Sommerfreund, J., Rosen, E., Gray, J., Somers, S., Gillett, J., & Frid, P. (2006). An evaluation of the Pediatric Acquired Brain Injury Community Outreach Program (PABICOP) (Facts To Go, Volume 2 Issue1). London, ON: Thames Valley Children's Centre.
Presentations:
     McDougall, J., Servais, M., Sommerfreund, J., Rosen, E., Gillett, J., Somers, S., & Gray, J. (2001, November). An evaluation of the Paediatric Acquired Brain Injury Community Outreach Program. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Ontario Association of Children's Rehabilitation Services, London, ON.
     Sommerfreund, J., Rosen, E., Gillett, J., & McDougall, J. (2001, May). Paediatric acquired brain injury community outreach program: An evaluation study. Presented at the 4th World Congress of Brain Injury, Torina, Italy.
     McDougall, J., Servais, M., Sommerfreund, J., Rosen, E., Gillett, J., Somers, S., & Gray, J. (2001, May). An evaluation of the paediatric acquired brain injury community outreach program. Poster presented at the University of Western Ontario's fifteenth annual research day of the School of Nursing, London, ON.
     McDougall, J., Sommerfreund, J., Rosen, E., Gillett, J., Somers, S., Gray, J., & Servais, M. (2002, May). The Paediatric Acquired Brain Injury Community Outreach Program. Presented at the Danish Resource Centre of Brain Injury, Nyborg, Denmark.
     McDougall, J. & Somers, S. (2006, September). An Evaluation of the Pediatric Acquired Brain Injury Community Outreach Program (PABICOP). Presented at annual meeting of the Ontario Association of Children's Rehabilitation Services, Niagara Falls, ON.
     McDougall, J., Gray, J., Somers, S., Servais, M., Sommerfreund, J., Rosen, E., Gillett, J., & Frid, P. (2006, November). An Evaluation of the Pediatric Acquired Brain Injury Community Outreach Program (PABICOP). Presented at the Toronto ABI Network Conference, Toronto, ON.
     Gray, J., McDougall, J., Somers, S., Servais, M., Sommerfreund, J., Rosen, E., Gillett, J., DeWit, D., & Frid, P. (2007, November). An evaluation of the Pediatric Acquired Brain Injury Community Outreach Program (PABICOP). Poster presented at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) conference New Frontiers in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury, San Diego, CA.


An evaluation of the Youth En Route Program (YER)
Investigators: J. Evans, P. Baldwin, J. McDougall, M. A. Tucker, & L. Ayearst  
Affiliation of Collaborator: Hutton House, London Association for Disabled Adults
Funding: Thames Valley Children's Centre Research Award, 2000-2002, $5,000
Status: Completed  
      Youth En Route (YER) is a program designed to involve youth in the transitional activities of career exploration, supported goal-setting and planning, skill development and community experiences. All of the program goals lead to the ultimate goal of improved quality of life for Youth En Route logoyouth after exiting from secondary school programs. The goal of the program is to successfully launch these individuals into their communities so that they can experience quality lifestyles through their engagement in a combination of employment, post-secondary education, voluntarism, and leisure activities. The aim of this program evaluation study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the YER program in achieving its primary goals of increasing participants' self-determination skills, sense of control over their future directions, community participation, and overall life satisfaction. A second aim of this study was to evaluate the satisfaction of participants and their caregivers with the services of the program.
     The study found statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements among youth with multiple disabilities for all three of the study outcomes following involvement with YER. On average, youth were highly satisfied with the services they had received from YER.
Findings suggest the utility of ecologically-basedtransition programs with an underlying philosophy of self-determination that offer a flexible, multi-faceted approach to transition, including opportunities for self-discovery, skill development, and community experience.
Publications: 
      Evans, J., McDougall, J., & Baldwin, P. (2006). An evaluation of the Youth En Route program. Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 26(4), 63-87.
      McDougall, J., Evans, J., & Baldwin, P. (2005). Youth En Route: An evaluation of a transition program (Facts To Go, Volume 1, Issue 3). London, ON: Thames Valley Children's Centre.
Presentation:
     Baldwin, P., Evans, J., & McDougall, J. (2004, October). Youth En Route: A program evaluation. Presented at the Ontario Association of Children's Rehabilitation Services 2004, Richmond Hill, ON.

Development Resources for Infants: An evaluation
Investigators: J. Kneale Fanning, M. A. Tucker, J. Legros-Kelly, A. McVittie, J. Pigache, & A. Conti-Becker
Affiliations of Collaborators: St. Joseph Health Centre, Child and Parent Resource Institute
Funding: Thames Valley Children's Centre Program Evaluation Support Fund, 2003-2004, $10,000, and 2005-2006, $6,060
Status:Completed 
     The provision of a coordinated system of services that emphasizes partnership among families, professionals, and agencies is critical in developing children and enhancing families' quality of life. In 1999, the Developmental Resources for Infants (DRI) program was initiated by 2 community agencies and 2 hospitals to provide a collaborative approach to healthcare services for children from birth to two years of age. Prior to the implementation of DRI, families of children at risk for developmental delays or with established physical, cognitive, and/or multiple disabilities were often referred to or received services from one or more of these agencies. This meant that services such as intake, assessment, and intervention were duplicated, resulting in system inefficiencies.
     DRI was implemented with a common referral form, a central phone line, a coordinated intake, and a shared database. Through this collaboration, families with young, at-risk children could access the most appropriate and timely services to meet their needs through one point access. The collaboration provided an opportunity to increase communication among agencies and ensure services were not duplicated. In 2002, a research task force was formed to evaluate the DRI program. The study evaluated the DRI tools and processes, the staff and leaderships' perception of system collaboration, and the families' and community members' satisfaction with DRI services.
     The study found that DRI had achieved an identity and operating procedure that were unique and separate from any of the four partner agencies.
Publication:
     Kneale Fanning, J., Legros-Kelly, J., McVittie, A., Pigache, J., Tucker, M. A., & Servais, M. (2005). An evaluation of Developmental Resources for Infants: Collaborative health care services for infants and their families (Facts To Go, Volume 1 Issue 4, December 2005). London, ON: Thames Valley Children's Centre.


Evaluation of the Kids On-Track Program (KOT)
Investigators: T. Malloy-Miller, J. Arnett, B. Evans, W. Hobbs, C. Sinclair, A. Tims, & M. A. Tucker  
Affiliations of Collaborators: Middlesex-London Health Unit, Madame Vanier Children’s Services, KIDS COUNT/Investing in Children, Learning Disabilities Association of London-Middlesex, Thames Valley District School Board
Funding: National Crime Prevention Centre, 2000-2002, $25,000; Thames Valley Children’s Centre Research Award, 2001-2002, $5,000
Status: Completed 
     Kids-On-Track (KOT) is a program for children with differences in learning, attention, and movement, who may be beginning to indicate social interaction problems. The intent of the KOT program is to have  children (5 to 8 years) learn and use concepts related to thinking, motivation, and feeling. These concepts are then used to guide the children to make their own personal learning strategies with the support of their families and teachers. The children assume a leadership role by teaching their classmates about the concepts. The concepts used in the KOT program are from the Cognitive Enrichment Advantage approach (Katherine Greenberg, 2000).
     During two school years, the children met in small groups of up to 10 children where they had a chance to use thinking plans to deal with everyday difficulties. Parents and teachers were trained to be coaches and to help the children use the skills they had learned. The children in program were more likely to use or talk about the concepts that they had learned if the use of the concepts were reinforced and supported at home and at school. Parents observed their children to become more planful. Teachers felt that the concepts gave them a way to talk to their students about their thinking (i.e., where they were getting stuck, and how they were successful). They saw their students becoming more independent and attributed this to the discussion and use of the KOT concepts and techniques. Changes in the social and school success of the 44 children who were in the program were measured. Parents, teachers, and school administrators were very satisfied with the service that they received from the Kids On-Track  program. As of the fall of 2006, the Kids On-Track program has provided service to twenty-three schools in the London-Elgin-Oxford-Middlesex districts, reaching over 1,800 students annually.
Reference:
Greenberg, K. (2000). Cognitive Enrichment Advantage. Arlington Heights, IL: Skylight Professional Development.

 


Evaluation of the School-Support Program - Autism Spectrum Disorder (SSP-ASD) 
Investigators: K. Meyer, J. McDougall, M. Servais, S. Case, K. Dannenhold, S. Johnson, & C. Riggin    
Status: Completed, 2005-2006
     Increasing numbers of children are now diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the preschool years. Early intervention and preschool programs have become increasingly available, and have brought a corresponding demand for school-based services. In March of 2004, the Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth Services introduced a new program targeting school-aged children with ASD: the School Support Program - Autism Spectrum Disorder (SSP-ASD).
     This program provides consultation services to enhance supports for publicly funded school board staff in the provision of educational services for students with ASD. The SSP-ASD program draws upon a whole-school approach to provide a framework for enhancing school supports for students with ASD. Services are provided at the board, school, and classroom level. The program aims to modify aspects of the environment that may result in students’ challenging behaviours. The program has four cSchool Support Program logoomponents: planning, training, consultation, and resource development and sharing. ASD consultants, trained in a relevant field, provide services.
     This study examined the utility of the SSP-ASD program for enhancing school-level outcomes over the period of one school year. One hundred and ninety-two educators completed study measures in late fall and late spring. Seventy of those educators who reported receiving no services from the program were compared to 45 educators who had one to four contacts with the program and 77 educators who had five or more contacts with the program.
     Statistically significant main effects of program condition in favour of beneficial effects of the school support program were found for two school-level outcomes: ‘supports’ and ‘teaming and collaboration.’ Receiving services from the school support program over a period of one school year was indicated to be more useful for enhancing: (1) supports to educators to accommodate the needs of students, and (2) teaming and collaboration among relevant parties, than not receiving services from the program. Amount of service received appeared to influence outcomes. On average, educators were mostly to highly satisfied with the consultation process and the overall program. Educators reported all aspects of the program were useful, particularly professional development day sessions, and individual consultation and support. Study findings will be useful for enhancing services provided by the SSP-ASD program.
Publication:
     McDougall, J., Servais, M., Meyer, K., Case, S., Dannenhold, K., Johnson, S., & Riggin, C. (2006). An evaluation of the School Support Program - Autism Spectrum Disorder (SSP-ASD) (Facts To Go, Volume 2 Issue 2). London, ON: Thames Valley Children’s Centre.
Presentation:
    McDougall, J., Meyer, K., Case, S., Dannenhold, K., Johnson, S., Riggin, C., & Servais, M. (2007, October). An evaluation of the School Support Program-Autism Spectrum Disorder. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Ontario Association of Children’s Rehabilitation Services, Waterloo, ON.

Peer-mediated social skills for students with autism spectrum disorder: Promoting generalization through a school-wide approach (P.E.E.R. Pals Program)
Investigators:
Michelle Servais, Charmaine Chadwick, & Carmen Hall
Status: Completed, 2007-2008
     Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often have difficulties with social situations and peer interactions. These students need to be taught social skills directly as they do not naturally pick these skills up from their environment. Peer-mediated strategies have proven to be very effective in enhancing social skills in students with ASD. As part of service delivery to schools, the School Support Program–Autism Spectrum Disorder, Southwest Region created a Program to teach social skills to students with ASD: Peers Establishing Effective Relationships (PEER Pals Program). As part of the PEER Pals Program, social communication skills are taught in the classroom, student leaders run structured games at recess for trained peers to participate in, and diversity training is provided for the entire school. A total of 68 key informants (principals, teachers, educational assistants, and parents) participated in focus groups and 63 school staff returned mailed questionnaires on the perceived usefulness of the Program, their satisfaction with the Program, and the features that participants liked most and least about the Program. Study findings indicated program benefits for all students, including those with ASD, as well as teachers and other school staff.
Publication:
     Servais, M., Hall, C., Chadwick, C., & Lombardi, J. (2009). Peer-mediated school-based program proves successful in promoting positive social skills. (Facts To Go, Volume 5 Issue 3). London, ON: Thames Valley Children's Centre.
Presentations:
     Hall, C., Servais, M., & Chadwick, C. (2008, November). Effectiveness of peer-mediated social skills training: Prerequisites for generalization for students with autism. Presented at the Ontario Association for Behaviour Analysis (ONTABA) Annual Provincial Conference, Toronto, ON.
     Hall, C., Chadwick, C., & Servais, M. (2008, November). Reaching beyond the student with autism: A school-wide, peer-mediated approach to social skill teaching. Presented at the 52nd Ontario Provincial Conference of the Council for Exceptional Children, London, ON.

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Last Updated ( Wednesday, 22 January 2014 )