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Measures, Tools, and Resources Developed from Projects  E-mail

The following table contains a list of some of the research projects on which TVCC staff members were named investigators that developed measures, tools, or resources. Abstracts of the projects, and links to measures and tools are listed below the table. 

  • Names of present TVCC staff members are bolded and italicized.
  • Names of past TVCC staff members are italicized only.

Publications that have resulted from these selected projects are also listed. For information on how to obtain a copy of an article, please see Accessing Journal Articles.


List of Measures, Tools, and Resources Developed from Projects 

  • All About Outcomes - software to enable health service providers in children’s treatment centres to select the most appropriate outcome measure to use with individual clients and/or in program evaluations.
  • Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE) and Preferences for Activities of Children (PAC) - two measures that examine how children and youth participate in everyday activities outside of mandated school activities, and their preferences for activities.
  • Community Impacts of Research Oriented Partnerships (CIROP) - a reliable and valid survey measure of the community impacts of research partnerships between universities and community agencies that address social and health services issues.
  • Effective Listening and Interactive Communication Skills (ELICS) - a measure to assess effective listening and interactive communication skills in the delivery of children's rehabilitation service.
  • Goal Attainment Scaling Manual (2nd edition) - a resource book/training manual to assist  clinicians, administrators, and researchers when using GAS to monitor change over time for individual clients and/or to evaluate the effectiveness of programs and services. The second edition has been updated to include current literature and to explain and provide examples of how goals can be written for all functional levels identified in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (i.e., impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions).
  • Keeping It Together (KIT) -  a Parent Information Kit for parents of children with special needs. The KIT: Keeping it Together™ was designed to help these parents use information as a tool that will help them to get ‘the best' for their child(ren). The KIT includes strategies, tips and resources about giving, getting and organizing information in an effective way. The KIT is intended to provide parents of children with special needs with the tools they need to communicate and interact effectively with people in different systems.
  • Measuring Processes of Caregiving (MPOC) - an instrument to measure the processes of professional care-giving and to later examine the relationship between the processes of care-giving and parental psychosocial well-being. The psychosocial problems experienced by some parents of children with disabilities may be minimized or prevented through the care-giving offered by health care professionals to these children and their parents.
  • MPOC for Service Providers (MPOC-SP) - a self-assessment tool for pediatric health professionals, to measure their self-reported implementation of family-centred, adapted from the parent measure the Measure of Processes of Care. It is a discriminative tool useful for educational, program evaluation, professional development and research initiatives.
  • Multidimensional Peer Rating of the Clinical Behaviours of Pediatric Therapists (MPR) - a peer rating measure of clinical behaviours and clinical decision making among pediatric therapists, useful in conceptualizing clinical expertise in the context of pediatrictric rehabilitation.
  • Therapy Intervention Methods Checklist (TIMC) - a checklist to identify the intervention methods used by occupational therapists, physical therapists, and speech-language pathologists in the school setting.

 


All About Outcomes©

Developing All About Outcomes©, Part 1: Measuring clinical outcomes in children’s rehabilitation centres
Investigators: M. Law, G. King, E. MacKinnon, C. Murphy, & D. Russell
Affiliation of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, Pathways Health Centre for Children
Funding: Ontario Health Care Evaluation Network, 1995-1996, $20,000
Status: Completed
     This project was the first of two studies designed to develop and test a computerized software program that would enable health service providers in children’s treatment centres to select the most appropriate outcome measure to use with individual clients and/or in program evaluations. The software All About Outcomes© was developed and tested in partnership with the children’s centre in Sarnia. Using a before and after research design, the effect of the software on the knowledge and use of clinical outcome measures were evaluated. This software will facilitate the transfer of research All About Outcomesinformation about rehabilitation outcome measures into practice and will enable pediatric rehabilitation service providers to use appropriate outcome measures with demonstrated reliability, validity, clinical responsiveness, and clinical utility.
     All About Outcomes©: An educational software program to help you understand, evaluate, and choose pediatric outcome measures. All About Outcomes is a computerized, self-directed multimedia software program for students learning about outcome measures and for practitioners working in pediatric rehabilitation. This one-of-a-kind CD-ROM enables the user to select the most appropriate outcome measure for an individual, client, service, and/or program evaluation. This program guides you through a protocol for making decisions about outcomes and is linked to an outcome measures database of critically appraised children's outcome measures and is available from SLACK Books Inc.
Publications:
     Law, M., King, G., MacKinnon, E., Russell, D., Murphy, C., & Hurley, P. (1997). Measuring outcomes in children’s rehabilitation centres in Ontario: A report on the feasibility study of the All About Outcomes© software. Published and distributed by CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research. Copies are available from the CanChild website at http://www.canchild.ca/.
      Law, M., Hurley, P., Russell, D., King, G., & Hanna, S. (2003). Selecting outcome measures in children’s rehabilitation: A comparison of methods. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 84(4), 496-499.
      Law, M., King, G., Russell, D., MacKinnon, E., Hurley, P. & Murphy, C. (1999). Measuring outcomes in children’s rehabilitation: A decision protocol. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 80, 629-636.

Developing All About Outcomes©, Part 2: Rehabilitation outcomes: From research into practice, making new knowledge available to service providers
Investigators: M. Law, P. Rosenbaum, D. Russell, G. King, S. King, & E. MacKinnon
Affiliation of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research
Funding: Chedoke Division of the Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, 1996-1998, $250,000
Status: Completed
     This was the second of two studies whose purpose was to develop and test the computerized, self-directed software program All About Outcomes© that would enable health service providers in adolescent and adult rehabilitation treatment centres to select the most appropriate outcome measure to use with individual clients and/or program evaluations.
The availability of valid outcome measures and the development of techniques for individualized measures has increased over the past few years. Availability has not, however, ensured the transfer of the use of outcome measures in rehabilitation practice. There are two important factors that have limited the transfer of outcome measurement information into practice: (a) the lack of a decision-making protocol to guide rehabilitation practitioners in the selection and use of measures; and (b) the difficulty in assembling outcome information from many literature sources and assessing the methodological rigour of these outcome measures. 
     To overcome these factors, investigators at CanChild have developed a measurement protocol for rehabilitation outcomes, as well as an accompanying educational software program. The software is a self-directed program that enables rehabilitation practitioners to select the most appropriate outcome measure to use with individual clients, services and/or programs. A modified version of the International Classification of Impairment, Disability and Handicap was used as a measurement framework to guide outcome measure selection. The educational software is linked to a computerized database of critically appraised information on outcome measures. Service providers, clients and managers can use the program to make decisions about what outcomes to measure and then search for reliable and valid methods of measuring selected outcomes. To date, the software program All About Outcomes©, has been developed and linked to a database of children's rehabilitation measures.
Publication:
      Law, M., King, G., & Russell, D. (2001). Guiding decisions about measuring outcomes in occupational therapy. In Law, M., C. Baum, and W. Dunn, (Eds.), Measuring occupational performance: support best practice in occupational therapy (pp. 31-40). Thorofare, NJ: Slack.


Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE) and Preferences for Activities of Children (PAC)
Investigators: G. King, M. Law, S. King, P. Hurley, S. Hanna, M. Kertoy, P. Rosenbaum, & N. Young
Affiliations of Collaborators: Thames Valley Children's Centre, CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, The University of Western Ontario School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, & The Hospital for Sick ChildrenCape Pac cover
Status: Completed
     Researchers from the Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs (Gillian King, from Thames Valley Children's Centre, and Marilyn Kertoy from The University of Western Ontario) worked together with researchers from CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, McMaster University (Mary Law, Susanne King, Patricia Hurley, Peter Rosenbaum, and Steven Hanna), and the Hospital for Sick Children (Nancy Young), to complete a three-year longitudinal study of the leisure and recreational participation of 427 children with physical disabilities.
      As a result of this research study, The Participation of Children with Disabilities, they have created two measures that examine how children and youth participate in everyday activities outside of mandated school activities, and their preferences for activities. In November 2004, these measures, the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE) and its companion measure, Preferences for Activities of Children (PAC) were published by PsychCorp /Harcourt Assessment. Both measures are appropriate for children and youth with and without disabilities between 6 and 21 years of age, since the items reflect activities done by any child. The items were developed through a review of the literature, expert review, and pilot testing of the CAPE and PAC with children both with and without disabilities.
      The CAPE is a 55-item measureof 5 dimensions of participation (diversity, intensity, with whom, where, and enjoyment) providing 3 levels of scoring: (1) overall participation scores, (2) domain scores reflecting participation in formal and informal activities, and (3) scores reflecting participation in five types of activities (i.e., Recreational, Active Physical, Social, Skill-Based, and Self-Improvement Activities). The PAC is a parallel measure of preference for activities, which can be scored on the same three levels.
Publication:
     King, G., Law, M., King, S., Hurley, P., Hanna, S., Kertoy, M., Rosenbaum, P., & Young, N. (2004). Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE) and Preferences for Activities of Children (PAC). San Antonio, TX: Harcourt Assessment Inc.

Click here to get more information about the CAPE and PAC.


Community Impacts of Research Oriented Partnerships (CIROP)

The Impact Measure: Community Impacts of Research Oriented Partnerships (CIROP)
Investigators: G. King, M. Law, C. Forchuk, T. Willoughby, P. Rosenbaum, M. Kertoy, H. Chalmers, J. Specht, & M. Currie
Affiliation of Collaborators: Thames Valley Children's Centre, CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, The University of Western Ontario Department of Nursing, Brock University Department of Child and Youth Studies, The University of Western Ontario School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Brock University Department of Psychology, The University of Western Ontario Faculty of Education
Funding: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, $150,000
Status: Completed
      Five community-university research partnerships joined together to develop a reliable and valid survey measure of the community impacts of research partnerships between universities and coCIROP Measuremmunity agencies that address social and health services issues. The newly developed measure is called the Community Impacts of Research Oriented Partnerships (CIROP) Measure. The CIROP looks at the areas of Knowledge Enhancement, Research Skill Enhancement, and Use of Information.
     Why are we interested in the impacts or perceived benefits of research partnerships? Research partnerships are proliferating in Canada and elsewhere. It is generally assumed that research partnerships produce knowledge that informs community members and leads to more efficient service delivery, more effective clinical programs, and enhanced community development. There is, however, little concrete evidence of these benefits, in part due to the lack of a reliable and valid tool to measure the various types of community impacts. We anticipate that the CIROP Measure will have wide utility and will be used by members of research partnerships who wish to evaluate their effectiveness and adjust their activities to meet the needs of the community.
     The community participants and researchers of the five research partnerships were invited to complete this questionnaire to establish whether the measure is a valid and reliable tool. Once the testing of this new measure was, the CIROP measure will be available for use free-of-charge on the websites of each of the 5 involved research partnerships.
      The five community-university research partnerships who have joined together to develop the CIROP measure are:

Publications: 
     King, G., Servais, M., Specht, J., Currie, M., Rosenbaum, P., Law, M., Forchuk, C., Chalmers, H., & Willoughby, T. (2009). A measure of community members' perceptions of the impacts of research partnerships in Health and Social Services. Evaluation and Program Planning, 32, 289-299. (PMID:19304326)

Development of the CIROP   
A Model of the Types of Community Impacts of Research Partnerships
     We began by creating a model that outlines three major areas oCommunity Impact Modelf impact that correspond to the core functions of collaborative research partnerships discussed in the research literature (i.e., knowledge generation, research education and training, and knowledge sharing; see Currie et al., 2005). Click here to access our interactive, animated model.
How We Developed the CIROP
     We created items for the measure based on: (a) items of impact from the research literature that reflected the 3 mid-term impact domains in our Impact Model (i.e., Knowledge Enhancement, Research Skill Enhancement, and Information Use), and (b) information gained from focus groups with key informants. To evaluate whether our measure was reliable and valid, we invited community members and researchers, involved in any way with our Partnerships, to complete the CIROP. This testing provided us with feedback about how to refine the tool. We are currently working on an article describing the detailed development of this instrument.
    
We began by creating a model that outlines threehttp://www.impactmeasure.org/model.htm major areas of impact that correspond to the core functions of collaborative research partnerships discussed in the research literature (i.e., knowledge generation, research education and training, and knowledge sharing; see Currie et al., 2005). Click here to access our interactive, animated model.
Introducing the CIROP Measure
     The CIROP will inform research partnerships about the amount of impact, if any, they are having on their target audiences in the areas of Knowledge Enhancement, Research Skill Development, and Information Use. This tool is designed to measure the impact of research partnerships (in the social and health service sectors) from the perspective of community members and researchers (i.e., those receiving information or services from the partnership, or those involved in the partnership).
Uses of the CIROP
     Research partnerships wishing to evaluate their effectiveness may invite the intended users or beneficiaries of their partnerships knowledge sharing and education efforts to complete the CIROP. This instrument also will allow community stakeholders and advisory boards to capture the success of their collaborative research initiatives.

Click here to get a free copy of the final version of the CIROP.

Other Evaluation Materials Available for Research Partnerships
In the process of developing the CIROP Measure, we have created other structured data-gathering forms and checklists to be used by research partnerships. These items will also be available through our website.

  • Research Contact Checklist: Research partnerships produce and disseminate research-related material. In response to this material, people may contact partnerships. The RCC was created to collect information about the number and the nature of the requests that partnerships are receiving. Click here to get a free copy. 
  • Background Information Form for Research Partnerships: The BIFRP is designed to collect descriptive background information about a Research Partnership. The BIFRP will provide research partnerships with ideas about the types of information that they may want to track. Click here to get a free copy. 
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Effective Listening and Interactive Communication Skills (ELICS)

Effective Listening and Interactive Communication Skills in the Delivery of Services to Children and Families
Investigators:
G. King, L. Bolack, C. Willoughby, T. Shepherd, & M. Servais
Affiliation: Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital
Status: Completed
     The intent of this project was to produce an article on the nature of effective listening and interactive communication skills of pediatric rehabilitation therapists. The development of ELICS measures six areas of skill that together comprise the core listening and face-to-face communication skills needed to work effectively with facilies in the delivery of children's services. It provides useful information that raises therapists' self-awareness, encourages insight, and motivates therapits to improve their listening and communication skills. 
     This self-assessment tool also beneficial for the ongoing professional developmetn of practicing pediatric rehabilitation therapists adn the university preparation of therapists.
Publication:
      
King, G., Servais, M., Bolack, L., Shepherd, T., & Willoughby C. (2012). Development of a measure to assess effective listening and interactive communication skills in the delivery of children's rehabilitation service. Disability and Rehabilitation, 34(6), 459-469. doi: 10.3109/09638288.2011.608143

To access a pdf of this article, please click on the link below
Development_of_Clinical_Listening_Tool_ELICS


Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) Manual  

Goal Attainment Scaling: Description, Utility, and Applications in Pediatric Therapy Services, Second Edition. A Resource Book/Training Manual
Investigators: G. King, J. McDougall M. A. Tucker, J. Gritzan, T. Malloy-Miller, P. Alambets, D. Cunning, K. Thomas, & K. Gregory
Status: Completed
Resource Book/Training Manual Prepared by: Janette McDougall & Gillian King
     A resource book/training manual about using Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) in pediatric therapy services was developed as part of a larger study that used GAS to evaluate school health support services for children with special needs. GAS is an individualized, criterion-referenced measure of change. Using GAS involves defining a set of unique goals for a client, and then specifying a range of outcomes on a scale recommended to contain five levels, which reflect concrete functional activities.
A first edition of the resource book/training manual was developed as a resource to assist  clinicians, administrators, and researchers when using GAS to monitor change over time for individual clients and/or to evaluate the effectiveness of programs and services. The second edition has been updated to include current literature and to explain and provide examples of how goals can be written for all functional levels identified in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (i.e., impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions).
     The authors of this manual have provided training to small and large groups of clinicians at Thames Valley Children’s Centre and other children’s treatment centres in Ontario, in addition to using GAS to evaluate pediatric therapy programs. 
     Click here to download a free copy of the resource book/training manual pdfbullet.gif
 Publications:
     King, G., McDougall, J., Palisano, R. J., Gritzan, J., Tucker, M.A. (1999). Goal attainment scaling: Its use in evaluating pediatric therapy programs. Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 19, 30-52.
     King, G., McDougall, J., Tucker, M. A., Gritzan, J., Malloy-Miller, T., Alambets, P., Cunning, D., Thomas, K., & Gregory, K. (1999). An evaluation of functional, school-based therapy services for children with special needs. Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 19, 5-29.



Keeping Information Together (KIT)

Resource Kit, Part 1: Developing resources to enhance service delivery to children with disabilities and their families
Investigators: M. Law, P. Rosenbaum, N. Pollock, G. King, S. King, D. Russell, M. Gemus, M. Kertoy, & C. Missiuna
Affiliations of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, The University of Western Ontario
Funding: Anonymous Private Donation, 2000-2002, $125,000
Status: Completed
     A team of researchers, service providers and parents collaborated to develop a Parent Information Kit for parents of children with special needs. The KIT: Keeping it Together™ was designed to help these parents use information as a tool that will help them to get ‘the best' for their child(ren). The KIT includes strategies, tips and resources about giving, getting and organizing information in an effective Keeping It Together Resource Kitway. The KIT is intended to provide parents of children with special needs with the tools they need to communicate and interact effectively with people in different systems. It is useful for parents of children with a wide variety of special needs and all developmental ages from birth to 21 years, as well as for service providers who work within a family-centred model.
      The KIT was developed through focus groups, interviews and field testing with parents of children with special needs at the Hamilton Family Network. Also, parent experts and members of parent support groups in Ontario provided consultation about the content and format of the KIT. Click here to get more information on the KIT.

Resource Kit, Part 2: Evaluation of a parent resource information kit: Use, utility, and impact
Investigators: M. Law, D. Stewart, J. Burke-Gaffney, T. Szkut, C. Missiuna, P. Rosenbaum, G. King, & S. King
Affiliations of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, Hamilton Family Network
Funding: Easter Seal Association, 2001-2003, $70,600
Status: Completed
     Research indicated that parents of children with special needs required a resource that would assist them to give, get, and organize information to meet the needs of their child. Keeping Information Together, or the KIT, is one such resource. The KIT was the collaborative work of researchers from CanChild, and parents from the Hamilton Family Network. The KIT was designed to be used by families to increase their skills and satisfaction in working together with service providers for their children. It includes a User’s Guide, with tips and strategies for giving, getting, and organizing information, and a Binder that parents use to organize their information. 
     The focus of this two-year prospective evaluation was to determine the perceptions of impact and use of the KIT in pediatric rehabilitation settings.The study involved 439 parents with children who vary in their age, diagnosis, severity of symptoms, age of diagnosis, location, and in the type of services/systems they are involved with. All participants were asked to complete a pre-Kit questionnaire, as well as other feedback questionnaires regarding the use of the KIT in various settings/contexts at different points over the course of one year.Researchers found that parents were using the KIT in a variety of situations, and with several different service systems (e.g., health care, education, social services).
     Most participants found the KIT easy to understand and well-organized, but not everyone was able to use the KIT actively. Participants stated that lack of time was the primary barrier to use. Many excellent suggestions were made to improve on or add forms to meet all families information needs. Due to the significant demand for the KIT, plans to revise the KIT using findings from this study are underway. CanChild is working together with Easter Seals to secure funding to produce and distribute more KIT’s to families of children with special needs. For more information on the KIT, go to http://www.canchild.ca/.

Resource Kit, Part 3: Development and testing of a resource kit for parents of young adults who receive individualized funding for support
Investigators: D. Stewart, M. Law, C. Missiuna, G. King, & P. Rosenbaum
Affiliation of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research
Funding: Ministry of Community and Social Services, 2002-2007, $43,500
Status: Completed
     The goal of this project is to develop a Resource Kit that can be broadly circulated to families who receive individualized funding. It is expected to enhance the quality of life and community participation of young adults with disabilities. This five-year project will assist them in the management of the funding and their work as parents to find supports for their children and family. The Resource Kit will be developed with the 10 families who are involved in the Opening Doors project. Researchers will seek input from all families as to the content and format of such a kit. Another goal is to evaluate the Resource Kit as to its use, utility and impact. A prototype of the Research Kit will be given to all families to use during the Opening Doors project in years two to five.
Publication:
    
Stewart, D., Law, M., Burke-Gaffney, J., Missiuna, C., Rosenbaum, P., King, G., Moning, T., & King, S. (2006). Keeping it together: An informaiton KIT for parents of children and youth with special needs. Child Care, Health and Development. 32(4), 493-500.

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Measuring Processes of Caregiving (MPOC)

Creating the MPOC, Part 1: Measuring processes of caregiving and parental psychosocial well-being
Investigators: G. King, S. King, P. Rosenbaum, & A. Willan
Affiliation of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research http://www.canchild.ca/
Funding: Ontario Ministry of Health funding for CanChild
Status: Completed
     This was the first of two studies conducted to construct a valid and reliable instrument that would measure the processes of professional care-giving. Development of such a measurement tool was deemed necessary in order to later examine the relationship between the processes of care-giving and parental psychosocial well-being. The psychosocial problems experienced by some parents of children with disabilities may be minimized or prevented through the care-giving offered by health care professionals to these children and their parents. The resulting outcome measure is called the Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC). 
     The construction phase involved four parts:

  1. focus groups with parents from three children's treatment centres to clarify the meaning of important aspects of care previously identified;
  2. review of the literature and discussions concerning instrument format and scaling; 
  3. item generation and writing of items based on information from parents and the literature; and 
  4. pilot testing with 653 parents to reduce the pool of 101 items to a more manageable size (based on the results of factor analyses and measures of internal consistency). The end result was the development of a 49-item MPOC tapping six factor-analytically determined scales (Coordinated and Comprehensive Care, Partnership and Enabling, Respectful and Supportive Care, Providing General Information, Providing Specific Information about the Child, and Accessible Care). Each scale was found to have high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha ranging from .78 to .94).

      In the reliability phase, MPOC-49 showed good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients for the scales ranged from .73 to .85). The validity phase compared MPOC-49 scale scores with measures of satisfaction and stress.
     MPOC-49 scale scores correlated highly with a standardized measure of satisfaction (Pearson correlations ranged from .40 to .72). MPOC-49 scale scores also were significantly correlated with an item measuring parental stress, providing some preliminary support for an association between parents' perceptions of care-giving and their stress. Click here to get more information about the MPOC.
Publication:
     King, S., Rosenbaum, P., & King, G. (1995). The Measure of Processes of Care: A means to assess family-centred behaviours of health care providers. Hamilton, ON: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research. http://www.canchild.ca/

Creating the MPOC, Part 2: Validation of Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC) and cross-sectional study of processes of caregiving and parental psychosocial well-being
Investigators: P. Rosenbaum, G. King, S. King, & A. Willan
Affiliation of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research http://www.canchild.ca/
Funding: Ontario Ministry of Health funding for CanChild
Status: Completed
     This cross-sectional study continued a multi-year program of research conducted to understand the relation between caregiving offered to parents of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities and parents' mental health. Specifically, this project was designed to examine the strength of the link between parents' perceptions of family-centred, professionally-provided caregiving and their emotional well-being (feelings of distress and depression). This was done in the context of other factors that might affect well-being (child behavior problems, coping strategies of parents, protective factors in the social environment, child factors related to disability, and family factors).
     In this process, further validation of the Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC) was conducted, and MPOC was used in a multi-centre cross-sectional study relating "received" or perceived professional care to parental psychosocial well-being. Refinement of the measure resulted in a 56-item version of MPOC containing five scales: Enabling and Partnership, Providing General Information, Providing Specific Information about the Child, Coordinated and Comprehensive Care, and Respectful and Supportive Care. Studies of reliability and validity for MPOC-56 demonstrated good psychometric properties.
     164 parents of children with non-progressive neurodevelopmental disorders (primarily cerebral palsy, spina bifida, or hydrocephalus) completed a series of instruments measuring the constructs of interest. Structural equation modeling showed that more family-centered caregiving was a significant predictor of parents' well-being. The most important predictors of well-being were child behavior problems and protective factors in the social environment. Services are most beneficial when they are delivered in a family-centered manner and address parent-identified issues such as the availability of social support, family functioning, and child behavior problems.
Publications:
     King, G., King, S., Rosenbaum, P. & Goffin, R. (1999). Family-centered caregiving and well-being of parents of children with disabilities: Linking process with outcome. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 24, 41-53. 
     King, G., Law, M., King, S., & Rosenbaum, P. (1998). Parents' and service providers' perceptions of the family-centredness of children's rehabilitation services. Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics,18 (1), 21-40. 
     King, G., Rosenbaum, R., & King, S. (1997). Evaluating family-centred service using a measure of parents' perceptions. Child: Care, Health and Development, 23(1), 47-62.
     King, S., Rosenbaum, P., & King, G. (1996). Parents' perceptions of caregiving: Development and validation of a measure of processes. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 38, 757-772.
     King, G., King, S., & Rosenbaum, P. (1996). How mothers and fathers view professional care-giving for children with disabilities. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 38, 397-407. 
     King, S., Rosenbaum, P., & King, G. (1995). The Measure of Processes of Care: A means to assess family-centred behaviours of health care providers. Hamilton, ON: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, McMaster University.
     King, G., King, S., & Rosenbaum, P. (1995). Parents' perceptions of care-giving provided by ATCO centres: A report to centres from the MPOC research group. Hamilton, ON: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, McMaster University.  
     King, S., King, G., & Rosenbaum, P. (1994). Report to parents from the MPOC research group on the development of a Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC). Hamilton, ON: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research, McMaster University. 

Creating the MPOC, Part 3: Family-centred service: Developing and validating a self-assessment tool for pediatric service providers (MPOC-SP)
Investigators: J. Woodside, P. Rosenbaum, S. King, & G. King
Affiliation of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research
Funding: Ontario Ministry of Health funding for CanChild
Status:
Completed
      This study was designed to develop a self-assessment tool for pediatric health professionals, to measure their self-reported implementation of family-centred. The Measure of Processes of Care for Service Providers, adapted from the parent measure the Measure of Processes of Care, is the resulting outcome measure. It is a discriminative tool useful for educational, program evaluation, professional development and research initiatives. Click here to get more information on the MPOC-SP. 
Publication:
     Woodside, J., Rosenbaum, P., King, S., & King, G. (2001). Family-centred service: Developing and validating a self-assessment tool for pediatric service providers. Children’s Health Care, 30(3): 237-252.

Creating the MPOC, Part 4: Development of software for the Measure of Processes of Care
Investigators: P. Rosenbaum, S. King, & G. King
Affiliation of Collaborators: CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research
Funding: The Jack & Ina Pollock Foundation, 2001-2002, $7,500
Status: Completed
      The Measures of Processes of Care (MPOC) is a measurement instrument developed to assess the implementation of family-centred services within children’s rehabilitation centres. Although clinical program staff members are interested in using the MPOC, they may not have facility with computer-based data entry and analysis, making the MPOC less accessible as a program evaluation tool. The purpose of this project is to create a software program that would enable MPOC users to access the material and enter and analyse data easily. The researchers will also create a user’s guide and then evaluate the effectiveness of the software and user’s guide in facilitating the use and analysis of MPOC data.
Publications:
     King, G., Kertoy, M., King, S., Law, M., Rosenbaum, P., & Hurley, P. (2003). A measure of parents' and service providers' beliefs about participation in family-centered services. Children's Health Care, 32(3), 191-124.
     King, S., King, G., & Rosenbaum, P. (2004). Evaluating health service delivery to children with chronic conditions and their families: Development of a refined Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC-20). Children's Health Care, 33(1), 35-57.

 

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Multidimensional Peer Rating of the Clinical Behaviours of Pediatric Therapists (MPR)

Investigators: M. Gilpin, G. King, M. Currie, D. Bartlett, C. Willoughby, D. Strachan, M. A. Tucker, & D. Baxter
Status: Completed
     The MPR is a peer rating measure that was originally developed for research on clinical decision making among pediatric therapists, conducted by King et al (2005). During the course of this research, the MPR was determined to be a useful way of conceptualizing clinical expertise in a manner that was both reliable and meaningful in the context of pediatrict rehabilitation. The MPR consists of 4 subscale: Clinical Skill, Interpersonal Skill, Mentorship, and Motivation. Clinical input and statistical analyses, taken together, have found the MPR to be a reliable and valid means of capturing peer ratings of clinical behaviours. The MPR may be a useful research tool for those interested in further study of the complex field of pediatric expertise. Efforts to define expertise have been, to date, restricted to global indicators (such as number of years in practice or peer opinion). The MPR provides an alternative way to explore the multidimensional nature of clinical expertise. The MPR may also prove to be a useful way for pediatric therapists to obtain feedback on their clinical behaviours in a way that reflects day-to-day behaviours that they display during the therapeutic process.
Publication:
      Gilpin, M., King, G., Currie, M., Bartlett, D., Willoughby, C., Strachan, D., Tucker, M. A., & Baxter, D. (2005). The Multidimensional Peer Rating of the Clinical Behaviours of Pediatric Therapists (MPR) (Focus On, Volume 5 Issue 4). London, ON: Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs.

For more information about the MPR, or to receive a copy of this measure, email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Therapy Intervention Methods Checklist (TIMC)

Investigators: J. McDougall, G. King, T. Malloy-Miller, J. Gritzan, M. A. Tucker, & J. Evans
Status: Completed
     The TIMC was developed as part of a larger study evaluating school health support services for children with special needs. The TIMC was designed to be able to identify the intervention methods used by occupational therapists, physical therapists, and speech-language pathologists in the school setting. The checklist was pilot-tested on a group of 15 therapists working in a school-based therapy services program. Content validity was estimated through a peer review process and by examining frequency distributions. Reliability was estimated using a test-retest approach. Five categories of methods are included in the checklist: Cognitive Strategies, Teaching/Learning Techniques, Handling/Physical Interventions, Environmental/Task Modifications, and Information Sharing.
Publicaton:
     McDougall, J., King, G., Malloy-Miller, T., Gritzan, J., Tucker, M. A., & Evans, J. (1999). A checklist to determine the methods of intervention using in school-based therapy: Development and pilot testing. Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 19, 53-76.

To get a free copy of the TIMC, email This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it .


 

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Last Updated ( Monday, 09 December 2013 )